Blue Lock Review Vol 1 & 2 : The beginning of a long story

Blue Lock Review Vol 1 & 2 : The beginning of a long story

Blue Lock Vol 1 Review

With a brand new promo video for the anime adaptation that was released recently there is a lot of hype for Muneyuki Kanteshiro and Yusuke Nomura’s Blue Lock. What better time than to go through the manga to see if it is different in comparison to other sports shows? While competition is an integral part of the genre, so too is teamwork. the manga Blue Lock brings the former to eleven while challenging the latter. Blue Lock is a completely different approach to soccer manga. It tells the story of a player striving to be their best. In all honesty what makes Vol. 1 a good book?

To learn more about what makes the manga’s concept distinctive, here’s a story summary by Kodansha:

Synopsis

After a devastating loss in the 2018 World Cup, Japan’s team is struggling to come back. What’s lacking? A true Ace striker, who will lead them to victory. It’s been said that the Football Association is hell-bent on creating a striker who is hungry to score goals and desires success. Also, it could be the key element in turning around a lost match… And in order to do this they’ve brought together 300 of Japan’s most talented and brightest youngsters. Who will be the one to lead the team… And are they able to beat out and defy everyone who is on their path?

Introduction Blue Lock

The infamous Blue Lock program is the basis for the majority all the drama in manga. This isn’t just a selective training facility for athletes with talent and a live-in facility where they’re not permitted to leave until they’re enrolled. The possibility of being expelled is never low. In addition, the possibility that it will end football careers of the athletes increases the tension. All this could create a great deal of tension for the players to deal with. However, it’s the club’s philosophy that drives the tension. Although soccer is an individual sport. Those looking to make it at the top of Blue Lock must embrace their self-esteem and only look out for their own interests.

Our protagonist Yoichi Isagi

Enter protagonist Yoichi Isagi. Just prior to going into Blue Lock his high school team is unable to advance to the national championships. Primarily due to his teammate’s inability to score the crucial goal. Yoichi’s brain: what would he have done if he’d scored the goal himself instead of letting it slip by? While he initially soothes himself with a rant about the importance of teamwork. Blue Lock forces him to confront the tenets of that principle. Which is more important? maintaining supportive team dynamics or persevering for the sake of one’s own self, regardless of collateral consequences?

Every aspect of the life of Blue Lock forces Yoichi to be confronted with this dilemma and unleash a part of him. He didn’t realize that he had. Also, He regards it as a monster. Finally, he requires him to examine his moral compass even though his actions are in direct contradiction to it.

This is an example of plot devices that are imposed upon characters that are able to trigger continuous conflict and resulting development. A majority of the characters’ choices throughout the book aren’t ones which are easy to defend and instead reveal the worst and most ugly qualities as human beings. The story is about survival and the mental state needed to keep it going. So, the way in which it is executed these themes is enthralling.

Why Blue Lock is so funny !?

In terms of artistic talent, Nomura knocks it out of the park with this. The action is exciting to watch mainly due to the difficulty of trying to know what will happen. This is partly due to the speed of the game, but it is also due to Yoichi’s internal struggles. The flow of motion between scenes and characters is transparent and without any issues with clarity even when Nomura is juggling several characters at a time. There’s an underlying feeling of dynamism to the pieces that keeps people want to follow along from point A to B.

However, the most memorable part of the manga’s artwork can be seen in the face expressions. They are elementary school teens caught in a stress-inducing, life-altering scenario without support and their moods reflect this. The mix of anger and pain that appears in the expression of a player when the ball is thrown directly into his face is stunning. The reaction of the same player to being kicked out of the program is equally impressive. The perspective and the intense focus on certain facial characteristics (a bloody lip, angry eyes that look like they’re pulsating and so on.) makes the scene look like something straight from an horror manga. The extreme nature of the series works to its advantage.

Furthermore, Jinpachi Ego, the figurehead responsible for Blue Lock, is made even more sexist through his expressions. Jinpachi Ego is not given as much visual detail than other charactersand looks somewhat boring and sluggish when compared. His judgmental, dull eyes contrast well with the exhausted sweaty bodies of the boys to whom are sealed for him. It gives him a look of dissociation and egotism that is appropriate to his name and the philosophical style he takes.

Our Final Verdict ( Review ) Blue Lock Vol 1

Overall, Blue Lock Vol. 1 is a great debut volume. It’s a sports manga that’s cranked up to 11. Every aspect of the story designed to create the maximum amount of stress (and therefore, character development) for the main character. The art, on the other hand, is refined however it is incredibly intense and difficult take your eyes off of. Each and every detail in the manga is like it’s purposely designed to emphasize each other element. So it results in a finished product that is almost flawless. If the manga is one-third as good, then it’s going to be a massive success.

Final Review Blue Lock Vol 1

Blue Lock Vol 2 Review

The recent release of the first anime adaptation’s PV The anticipation is building for Muneyuki Kaneshiro, as well as Yusuke Nomura’s Blue Lock is increasing. I wrote a Review of the first volume.  I discussed how the story established its stakes and themes with a protagonist whose beliefs were in opposition to the criteria for winning and the way to survive the harsh new training program the character is now. Just barely making it through the initial round of player expulsions Yoichi Isagi along with his teammates have to now participate in a round robin competition with their spot in Blue Lock on the line. It’s more than a little pressure and it’s opening the way to more intense soccer. Does Blue Lock Vol. 2 meet the high expectations set by the series’ first installment?

Bachira Nomoura This player!

In terms of art, Nomura keeps delivering top-quality soccer action on this. With the sheer number of players in the field at any one time and how broad and diverse the angles of passes and kicks could be. It takes some careful planning to convey soccer’s chaotic character in the page. The layouts of Nomura are stunning not just because of the sheer number of information they manage. But in the clarity of their speed. It’s clear that there’s a lot of momentum as the ball moves towards the goal. The layout selections emphasize the team-based aspect of the game as well as the players who are more focused on their own goals. There’s even a hint of humor in the form of when a player tries to hit the ball head-on. But is unable to do so and then falls to on the ground head-first.

Development Yoichi Isagi

Blue-Lock-Vol-2

There’s a lot to be praised about the development of this volume’s Yoichi. In the second of the two games described Yoichi faces one of his opponents whose actions can be predicted with confidence because of their stark similarities in their movements to the ones he has. The rival is a reminder Yoichi of himself, and more specifically the previous version of himself who failed to reach the national team. This is why the battle of the characters a significant illustration of the inner conflict Yoichi is going through and attempting to resolve. 

There’s the commitment to teamwork which his decades of experience have cultivated within him. In addition, there are the need to be unique by himself. Which has been triggered by the Blue Lock program has awakened in Yoichi. The pacing of Yoichi’s journey through both volumes has been extremely well-crafted. So, there’s a sense that he’s made significant progress from the point he began.

The highlights of this volume

The second book is an enjoyable read as its predecessor but there are some flaws in the pace of the games. Particularly there is a lot of time is wasted in pivotal games. This is mostly due to the gap it creates between players’ knowledge of the concept of momentum and the actual players’ knowledge. It’s hard to be completely absorbed in the drama of a team constantly getting its best efforts stopped even when a large portion of the fighting is omitted. This means that certain scenes read slightly more slack than what transpired in Vol. 1 and the stakes aren’t as high, even if legally are (thanks to the losses in Blue Lock effectively ending soccer careers). However, these concerns diminish as the volume increases into the future and when players are at the point of a clutch time it really feels like every move counts.

Check out : Blue Lock Review vol 3 & 4

Our Final Verdict ( Review ) Blue Lock Vol 2

Overall, Blue Lock Vol. 2 is another refined and thrilling installment. The art continues to amaze in the clarity and detail and Nomura and Kaneshiro truly are able to increase the intensity at just the right moments. It’s the same regarding the pacing. While the earlier scenes aren’t without their flaws, it’s all perfect once the players are in the most crucial scenes. Yoichi’s character’s storyline is well-written and the glimpses of the thoughts of other characters are fun and insightful. It’s an excellent manga to read.

Final Review Blue Lock Vol 2

We hope that you love our review on Blue Lock Vol 1 & 2.

Check Out : Blue Lock Vs Ao Ashi Review

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